Tuesday, September 19, 2017

My ultralight backpacking freezer bag cooking innovation


For years now, on backpacking trips, I used "freezer bag" cooking as a way to simplify mealtime. It means you package your meal in a ziplock quart size bag at home, pour boiling water in the bag at your campsite, and let it sit for 5 minutes or so while it rehydrates/cooks. 
This approach works great, but you do need something to hold your dinner bag with, both so you don't burn your hands and also to insulate it. Previously, I used a knit hat. It seemed like a good multi-purpose device - I could use it for warmth as well as for insulating my dinner bag.
However, there was a problem with using it to insulate my dinner bag. A knit hat has no structure at all, and flops all over the place. I almost never got through dinner without getting some of my dinner on my knit hat. And once I had spilled food on it, I really didn't want to use it as a knit hat until I was able to wash it.
So I was looking for an alternative, and thought about taping together some bubble wrap. The bubble wrap area at my local Walmart was right next to the bubble wrap mailer envelopes, though, and they looked like they might be the right size.


After some trimming at home, it turns out a 6 by 9.25 inch plastic bubble mailer is a great for a quart size ziplock. I've used it on multiple trips now, and it works really well, providing support for eating my dinner (with my long-handled spoon) and not burning my hands.


Friday, January 27, 2017

Incentive systems - they're challenging to design!

I wrote a blog post a while back about incentive systems, and how they're gamed. I thought of a few more examples. Last summer, trying to get the kids to help out with pulling weeds in the yard, I told them that they have to pull a certain amount (I think it was around 50), and then they'd be done. The only rule was that they needed to have the root, they couldn't just pull the green part.

What happened? Well, you never saw little micro-weeds smaller than the ones my kids pulled up. They were more like sprouts than real weeds.

It made me think of this quote, by Austrian economist F.A. Hayek:

The curious task of economics is to demonstrate to men how little they really know about what they imagine they can design.

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Kids lives have become more and more constrained

From one point of view, kids lives are better. They have so many more toys! They have an amazing amount of electronic stimulation! Their parents are constantly driving them here and there for sports, arts, and other enrichment activities!

But I look at many kids lives, and I'm saddened. What they do not have is so important. Here's some of the things that I had, growing up in the 1970's, that most kids (including mine) do not have:
The chance to knock on a neighbors door, to ask a child out to play, and have a 50/50 chance that they will be successful
The ability to roam freely in open areas with friends, doing things like making cattails swords. Just messing about in the outdoors, having fun.

In our neighborhood (and from what I hear from friends, most neighborhoods are like this), there are never any kids playing on the street. And I mean never. The chances that while walking around, you'll see any activity whatsoever except for an occasional dog-walker are almost nil.

When I was growing up, we frequently had large, kid-organized games of kickball and other games happening, with 6 to 10 kids.  My kids have literally never experienced any kid-organized activity like this. Sure, they're been to organized sports activities like soccer, where somebody tells them where to go, what to do, how to play, etc. But that's a 100% different experience, and much inferior to a group of kids working it out themselves, communicating and negotiating with their peers, and having fun on their own initiative.

I recommend the book Free-Range Kids, How to Raise Safe, Self-Reliant Children (Without Going Nuts with Worry) as a good overview of the problem. I can't say I have any particular solutions myself.



Monday, January 23, 2017

I thought I wasn't athletic, until I tried Pickleball!


I've been looking for a sport recently, and decided to try badminton, since I like racquet sports (though I never got really into tennis). It turns out there's a badminton center nearby, and they offered drop-in classes, so I took one after the first of the year. It turned out pretty well, I enjoyed it, and the instructor was good.

But over the weekend, a friend of mine had gone to the local community center, where they have drop-in pickleball, and told me I should try that. I went, and people were friendly and welcoming, teaching me the ropes and including me in games right away. I'm fairly coordinated, so I was able to play at a basic level right away. I had a total blast! Now I'm in love with it.


The funny thing is, I've tried pickleball a few times already, but didn't stick with it. I had heard about pickleball years ago, and went to a drop-in pickleball session at the Mercer Island community center. It was fine, but the level of play was fairly high, and people weren't all that welcoming to a new player. Which is fine, they were there to play, and not necessarily teach newbies. I should have persisted, but I didn't. Then a few years ago, a friend of mine who's really into pickleball took me to an outdoor court, showed me the ropes, and we played a bit. And still — I didn't pursue it anymore. There was still the "what next?" question — how to actually play with people (besides my friend, who lives a distance away).

Why is it that this time, I've really gotten into it? A couple reasons, really. One is that once I got up the courage to actually go, the players at the community center drop-in pickleball session were really friendly and made it easy for me to start up. Even though it took some guts to walk up to a bunch of strangers and essentially say, "please teach me pickleball", it was very much rewarded. Also, I've really been longing for a physical activity that involves winning and loosing — it just makes it so much more interesting than activities like swimming.  Also, the community center is really close by, and lots of people go for the drop-in pickleball, so there's plenty of people to play with.






Friday, January 20, 2017

Kids books nowadays don't reflect their lives (because playdates are boring)

A while back my son Peter was reading the book There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed Fly Guy. It's a fun beginning chapter book about a boy with a pet fly.


Fly Guy is riding his bike, alone, to his grandmother's house for an overnight stay
What struck me most is that in the book, the main character rides his bike, alone, with a backpack and with his pet fly on his shoulder, to visit his grandmother's house for an overnight stay. My immediate thought was—that would so never happen nowadays. Kids today are almost never allowed out of the house on their own. Much less on a bike, with a backpack, headed for an overnight stay.

The popular kids books nowadays (the Harry Potter series, the Rick Riordan books) do not talk about kids lives, as they're actually lived in the present day US. The kids in the books, much more so than in previous eras, live in a world of adventure and independence that's very, very far removed from their real lives. You wouldn't read in a children's book about kids going on a playdate, or being driven to soccer practice, because it's boring and there's no story, as the kids have no ability to make decisions.

I think kids today are missing out on so much, because their lives are so constrained and controlled. I'll be writing a few more blog posts on this topic soon.

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

The review system in Amazon is routinely hacked

I wrote a book recently called SQL Practice Problems: 57 beginning, intermediate, and advanced challenges for you to solve using a "learn-by-doing" approach, and published it on Amazon. It hasn't been a best-seller, but it was fun to write, and I think I did a good job of gradually increasing the difficulty of the problems, and introducing the most common problem that come up in database work.

A few weeks ago, when I looked up the general keyword "SQL" on Amazon.com, I was amazed to find that the book that's listed first is a thrown-together compilation of text copied from various websites (for instance, a website detailing ANSI SQL standards). The entire books is like that, completely useless garbage for anyone trying to learn SQL, and obviously written by someone who doesn't know anything at all about the topic, as a quick money-maker.


This terrible book comes up first on Amazon when you search for SQL
How the heck does this book regularly and consistently, every time I've looked, come up first when searching for books on SQL on Amazon?

I'll tell you why. Amazon has made positive reviews by verified buyers into either the most important factor, or one of the most important factors in ranking books. However, all of the positive reviews on this book are all paid for! How do I know this? Because I know the subject matter backwards and forwards, and I know how poor the quality of this book really is. I'd bet good money that all the five star reviews are paid for. Here's one that's obviously fake:
This book is simply amazing. I think many of the other reviewers have done a great job evaluating it. I just want to share my own experience because I like the book so much. I am not a tech savvy but I've taken a position that requires me to know how to run SQL queries. Therefore, I had no prior knowledge of SQL before buying this book. I've been able to go through the book, step by step, and understanding it. So if you are simply looking for how to get data out of a SQL Server like I am, this is the perfect book for you.
But here's one that's not so obvious. Had I not known better, I would have thought this was a real review:
I work with Microsoft SQL Server daily. I have literally read dozens of SQL books since my college days. Although I am very proficient in SQL now, I am constantly looking for the easiest way to teach the people I work with who have zero SQL experience. The most common problem with every book I have read is how they overcomplicated simple concepts and without simple examples. This book is truly a simple and easy to understand beginners guide. The best part about this book is the code examples it provided. They are real problems that you could face in your daily SQL operations. If you are a moderate experienced SQL user, you will find this book makes a great pocket reference.
Some of the obviously paid-for reviews are not even five star reviews! There are 72 five star reviews, and 31 four star reviews. I assume that if a book has too many five star reviews as compared to four star reviews, that's a red flag to the system. There's currently 72 five star reviews, and 31 four star reviews. I'm assuming that all of them are paid for.

Here's an interesting tidbit - there's only 1 three star review. And it seems like a real, not paid-for review. When you look up the reviewer, you notice a few things. Number 1, the reviewer actually shows their reviews. Many (but not all) of the reviewers who doing reviews for payment do not show their reviews. There must be some kind of setting in Amazon that allows you to hide reviews. Number 2, some of the other reviews that this reviewer has posted are for physical items, instead of Kindle books. The fake reviewers have posted mainly reviews for Kindle books.

I don't envy Amazon, having to come up with a system to weed out the real reviews from the fake, paid ones. It's a very difficult problem. But the honest truth is they're doing an awful job, based on the fact that in the area in which I'm most knowledgeable, the book that ranks highest has almost nothing but fake positive reviews and is a truly terrible book.

I've counted on Amazon reviews for years to give accurate information, and now I only do that with big caveats, and with a skeptical eye. I look at the negative reviews much more closely than the positive reviews.

What could Amazon do? I think for one, they need to pay more attention to the problem of fake reviews. Fake reviews are causing all reviews to become less valuable, and that's a big problem. It's a tricky problem because inevitably they will flag some real reviews as fake, and piss people off, and those people will complain mightily. But it's something they need to do, because as there are more fake reviews out there, the whole review system becomes much less valuable.

Monday, January 16, 2017

What to do for a broken toe? It depends who you ask...

My son sprained or broke his toe yesterday. It was painful, and swollen, and is a little discolored now.



He's not a complainer, so when he limped for hours, I looked online to see what the best options were. And of course, the course of action recommended is very heavily dependent on what type of site it is.

American websites—at least those run by professional organizations—will always recommend that you go immediately to a doctor. They'll say something like this:
If you think you have a fracture, it is important to see your doctor as soon as possible. A fracture that is not treated can lead to chronic foot pain and arthritis and affect your ability to walk.
(The above is a direct quote from the website of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons)

However, the NHS website (National Health Service, the government run health care service from the United Kingdom) specifically says that most broken toes can be treated at home, unless there's complications.

I'm not at all in favor of government run health care. However, these two different approaches are a really good example of how a difference in self-interest leads to a difference in opinion. The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons wants everyone to run to an orthopedic surgeon if they suspect there may be a sprain or a break because it's great for their bottom line.

But an organization like the UK National Health Service is trying to limit the number of people that go to the doctors office. And writing up webpages that advocate reasonable self-care is a good way to do that.

It's just like the saying "don't ask a barber if you need a haircut". I remember chatting with my hair-stylist, when getting my hair colored around the year 2007 or 2008, at the start of the recession, and asking her if her business had gone down at all, since many people were short of money. She immediately replied, very definitively, "Oh no, women always continue to get their hair done, because it's important to their self-esteem, and they cut back on everything else first". I immediately thought to myself—her self-interest is definitely coloring her opinion, and this is her view of what the world should be like. It didn't work—I color my hair myself now. It's much faster, and of course cheaper.

Friday, January 13, 2017

Meeting someone with a truly different background

We had dinner yesterday with the mother of a friend of ours, I'll call her Amy. Amy is from East Africa, and is maybe 5 or 10 years older than I am. It's been a very long time since I've spoken with someone at length who has had a really distinct background from mine, and it was a pleasure to spend time with her. She told some very interesting stories about her life in Africa, and her move about 7 years ago to Sweden, as a refugee.

First of all - she grew up in an agricultural village. She had to go to the river daily for water, carrying the water on her head in a clay jar. If she met a man, she had to bow to him (I didn't quite get how that could happen without the jar falling down, but apparently it's possible). She also had to wait until she could no longer hear the man's footsteps before she could start walking again.

Men in general were treated like kings, and acted like them. She had to ask her husband, who was known as a kindly man, for permission to go anywhere, including the market. She was extremely lucky in that she got an education, almost no girls her age did. Because she had three daughters, who were only "half children" (compared to sons), she had to always be concerned about being replaced with another wife. She was taught to kneel or curtsy to teachers or elders, or to greet guests.

Growing up in her village, animals were a constant danger. Five of her relatives were killed by animals. She has a hatred of wild animals to this day, especially snakes, which she hates particularly. A spitting cobra snake once spit in her eye and blinded her, but luckily with special herbal preparations she avoided being blinded permanently, which is a grave danger with spitting cobras. Amy loved her grandmother, and would walk a lonely path to her hut, always carrying a stick and rocks in case there were animals. She remembers with fondness evenings around  the campfire, where elders would tell stories, usually instructional stories involving animals, those were especially good times.

Moving to Sweden in her late 40's or early 50's was a massive adjustment in everything imaginable. When I asked what Sweden was like, the first word she said was "lonely". It was very difficult to adjust and to learn Swedish. There's much less social life for her there. She said it was like starting again in life.



Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Goodwill vs Value Village - which is better?

Ever since I've shopped for my own clothes, I've gone to thrift stores. I like them better than regular retail because there's so much more variety, there's always the "treasure hunt" aspect of it, and, of course, the prices are so much cheaper than standard retail.

Around here, in the Seattle area, there's 2 main chains of thrift stores, one for-profit (Value Village), and the other a nonprofit, Goodwill. I've been to both, a lot, and over the years have developed a clear favorite, which is Value Village. I think Value Village is run much more efficiently, and with the customer in mind.



For instance, I was looking at kitchen knives recently. At Goodwill, they were all jumbled together into a bin, with occasionally a piece of opaque masking tape over the sharp edge. It was very dangerous, because the masking tape came off sometimes, so you had to be extremely careful if you didn't want to get your fingers sliced. Also, you couldn't see the knife edge, to see whether it was straight or serrated, since it was covered with masking tape.

At Value Village, on the other hand, they've thought about it, and have a good solution. The knives have transparent, strong packing tape on their sharp edges, and on the side opposite the handle, there's a reinforced hole so it can go onto one of those straight hooks that store displays have. So instead of everything being tossed together into a bin, it's hung up, and customers can easily look through them.

You see this same type of quality difference everywhere when comparing Value Village and Goodwill. In Value Village, if a garment is hung in the Women's jeans, size 6 section, it will definitely be Women's jeans, size 6. In Goodwill, at least 25% will be incorrectly sorted.

Why is this? I've seen this at a lot of nonprofits. They're very invested in "doing good", and have signs everywhere about the people they're helping. Which I applaud. But that doesn't excuse them from doing a good job at the main purpose of the storeselling well-priced merchandise, organized properly, in a well-run store.

Value Village does a much better job, even though they start with significant disadvantages. For one, they pay taxes. They also actually pay for the items that are donated to them (via a scheme where they give credit to a local nonprofit for everything donated to them, even if it goes directly to them), as opposed to Goodwill, which gets straight donations. Also, there are many people who will only donate to Goodwill, specifically because they're a nonprofit.


Monday, January 09, 2017

Daily weigh-ins—they really work for getting weight off, and especially keeping it off

Back in 2010 I wrote a a post on this topic, called, Daily weigh-ins—they really work!.  I've been weighing myself daily now since then, and maintained my weight (more or less). I've also seen friends and relatives lose weight and gain the weight back again multiple times, doing various diet programs and detox programs. Everyone that's I know who's done these diet programs (weight watchers or other programs) has NOT weighed themselves daily. As a matter of fact, the diet programs my friends and relatives have been on actually instruct you to NOT weigh yourself daily, and only weigh yourself at the meetings.

My weight chart
I think avoiding a daily weigh-in is rotten idea if you have weight issues. Weighing yourself daily is the most powerful things you can do in order to maintain or lose weight. The companies that sell weight loss programs and devices would love to be the gatekeeper, and have you rely on them for help with your weight. But the most powerful, long-term answer to weight loss and maintenance is to control your weight yourself. You can do this in your home, in about 5 seconds a day, by stepping on the scale and making an x mark on a graph. When you notice that your weight is up a pound or two after an indulgent meal the evening before, that's a very powerful, critical nudge to eat more lightly the next day.

Will your weight fluctuate on a daily basis? Sure it will. It needn't bother you once you've gotten used to it, and realize that usually these fluctuations have a cause and can be accounted for.

What about the fat vs. muscle argument? Some people say that you shouldn't weigh yourself daily because you may get discouraged as the scale goes up, when you're actually gaining muscle instead of fat. I say that's baloney. Compared to the number of people that are overweight because they're too fat, the number that are overweight because they're muscular is tiny. Unless you know for sure you're one of them, this is not a reason to not step on the scale daily.

I did a little research online, to see what people are saying nowadays about weighing yourself daily to control your weight.

What did I find? When I searched for my exact old blog post title, the first link that comes up on Google was this self-serving post, 5 Reasons to Stop Weighing Yourself Everyday, put out by a company that sells very expensive body composition analysis machines, designed to be used "by professionals only". They're so expensive that there's not even a price, you have to call them for a quote. So they definitely don't want you to use something as cheap, easy, and accessible as a scale, because that would be bad for their business.

Next on the Google search results list was this post by Jillian Michaels, entitled "MYTH: WEIGHING YOURSELF DAILY WILL HELP YOU STAY ON TRACK". It's another story designed to sell her products—a meal plan and exercise app. She basically says that because for many people weighing themselves is a source of stress, and it should only happen once a week.

There are a few more links that are more even-handed, and do recommend weighing yourself daily. But the fact remains that the links that got highest up in the rankings are those that presumably spent the money on SEO, and as a consequence are giving out information that is bad advice for most people.


Friday, January 06, 2017

My 2 best tips for getting kids to do their chores

Okay, I know—most of the time, it's faster to clean and do other chores yourself. But there has to be a tipping point sometime, an age where the energy expended in actually getting the kids to do chores is less than the energy expended to do them yourself.

I think we've reached that tipping point, for some chores, with my kids—at least Kenny, my 13 year old. My younger son Peter (age 9) still daydreams quite a bit. Still, it's important for kids to do chores, to learn to do practical things and to contribute to the running of the household.

However, the arguing over whose turn it is to do the chore is something I want to avoid. One way we've made the assigning of chores easier is by the extremely simple rule that determines whose day it is. There's no chore chart, or labeled calendar. If it's an even date, it's Peter's turn. If it's an odd date, it's Kenny's turn. That very simple device avoids 95 percent of the arguing over whose turn it is. And that's the way my parents ran the dish-washing routine when my brother Tom and I did the dishes—the same odd/even thing.

Why does this only avoid 95% of the argument, and not 100%? That's because of the fact that there are more odd dates than even dates (some months having 31 days, and always starting with a 1). So when Kenny has 2 days in a row to do, there will be complaints. But he's older anyway, so this will be the way it is. With Peter I'll help out, to keep him on track. Kenny can mostly do it on his own.

The other tip that helps with the mess is that before they have screen time, there's certain things that need to be done (school things put away, room cleaned, bed made, etc). I have a checklist that they're supposed to go through before turning on their Ipads. It works remarkably well, but only if I'm diligent about actually checking whether they did the things on their list or not.

Thursday, January 05, 2017

The happiness of little fixes


The little fixes I'm talking about are the little physical things that don't work in your life. These are things that bug you frequently, but aren't necessarily serious enough for you to spend a lot of time and money on.

For instance, in the cabinet above my oven, I had no good place to store the lid for a casserole dish. I would always just prop it up on the side, trying to get the angle right so that it wouldn't slide down. But it usually would slide down, and prevent me from easily taking out my frequently used casserole dish. 



So recently I fixed it. It's a really hacky fix, but it works great. I just taped a large plastic straw from McDonald's down at about the right spot, so the lid couldn't slide. It took about 5 minutes, once I decided to do it, and almost all of that was finding the straw. But it works great now, I can get things in and out much more easily.

Another fix was sewing up my plastic laundry basket, which was tearing in a high-stress spot. There's nothing special about this laundry basket, but it's slimmer and lighter than the ones sold nowadays, so I wanted to keep it. I had fun with this, drilling holes in the plastic and sewing it up with a piece of plastic coated wire. The fix has lasted now at least 5 years or so, with no further tearing.


Making fixes like this is a good mood builder, for a couple reasons:

  • I've solved a problem that persistently bugged me
  • My environment now suits me better
  • When I later see these little fixes, I get a little micro burst of competency
Try it out! Find something small in your home that bugs you, and fix it. You'll love it!







Tuesday, January 03, 2017

A lesson on obesity from War and Peace

I decided a few months ago that I should be a little more ambitious with my reading, and finally read War and Peace by Tolstoy. I had picked it up multiple times over the years, but just couldn't get into it. This time, it was enjoyable once I got into the story, and started getting interested in the characters. I didn't have a hard time finishing it.


But anyway, in War and Peace I came across a quote that really illustrates an essential component of obesity. It's in a scene where the Russian army is chasing Napoleon's army back across Russia, in the dead of winter, with very little warm clothing and food. Both soldiers and prisoners of war are dying of cold and starvation on all sides. A group of soldiers is lounging around a campfire in the evening, commenting on the situation, and one soldier nicknamed Crow says,
"If a man’s sleek and fat he just grows thin, but for a thin man, it’s death."
The point is that over the entire history of humankind, this is exactly what has happened. Whenever there was a crop failure or a shortage of food for any reason, the fat got thin (and survived), but the thin died.

What does this mean? It means over the millennia, the people who survived to pass on their genes are the ones who ate what they could when there was a surplus of food, and developed a little extra layer of fat. Those genes that encourage us to eat more, to stuff ourselves when there's yummy food available, to get hungry easily—these are the genes that stuck around, because the people carrying them survived famines and food shortages.

Now, we have the opposite of food scarcity. We have a tremendous abundance of food, engineered to be as delicious as possible, relatively inexpensive, and available anytime, anywhere. So, our environment has changed tremendously.

Our genes haven't changed, though. They're still screaming at us, via our senses and desires, to eat, and eat more, before the next famine comes.

For whatever reason, this doesn't come up much in the whole discussion about obesity. It's not a problem of evil corporations that develop addictive food, and it's not a massive lack of willpower. It's the fact that while our environment has changed to become much richer in calories, our genetic heritage says, "eat now, so that you don't die when food is scarce".




Thursday, September 29, 2016

I've switched! From Remember the Milk to Workflowy for my to-dos

For organizing myself, I use my to-do list, and have done for years. I had it in my paper binder/organizer for years, then in my old Palm Pilot for many years, till 2010, when I switched to an Android phone, and also switched to the Remember the Milk task tracking app. It was a great app, very full-featured, with great support and a great website. It was a paid app, $25/year. I sent in a few tips for their "Tuesday Tips" contest, and one of them won a year's additional membership! That was exciting.

Anyway, I'd been thinking for a while that the app was a little too restrictive. For instance, I wanted to order the things on my to-do list. But other than setting a priority of 1, 2, or 3, that wasn't possible. You could hack it by putting fake letters in front of the to-do (for instance, a - buy bananas would sort over b - call mom). But that was pretty unsatisfactory. They had developed a new version, which included hierarchy and sorting, but I wasn't successful using it.

So after a lot of searching around, I've moved completely away from a to-do app at all. I'm now just using Workflowy, an online outlining tool. And I love it! It's a completely different concept from a to-do list. Instead of a list of to-dos, with various attributes like priority, due date, etc, it's a hierarchical information manager, with a great interface, very clean and minimal. One of my top level hierarchies is To-Do. Indenting/outdenting, moving things around - it's all very easy.

I'm sold on it. It's a free product until you add more than 500 list items a month, and once you get over 450 a month, there's a very sleek unobtrusive message box at the bottom telling you "450 of 500 free list items added". I'm skirting on the edge now, but I'm going to have to upgrade to paid membership pretty soon, which I'm okay with ($50/year).

I don't only use it for outlining, but also for tracking and organizing all kinds of things. For instance, my new business SQLPracticeProblems is managed almost entirely in Workflowy (a different section from the to-dos).

I don't use some of the more advanced features (tags, etc), but I may work up to that at some point. Right now I'm enjoying the flexibility of using an outlining tool, instead of a to-do app. I briefly considered OneNote, but it's a little too feature-rich and cluttered.

Actually, just now I did a tiny bit of research, because it strikes me that $50/year, paid every year, is actually a good chunk of money. I just took a look around at some other tools. So far, none have struck me as the right combination of usability and a clean/uncluttered look.

Tuesday, September 06, 2016

A few notes on our summer trip to Europe

We've been back for 3 weeks already, but the first 2 don't count since I got a massive sinus infection that only released its hold on me after I started taking antibiotics. I'm feeling peppy now, so time to jot a few notes before everything fades. I also put up a few select pictures here.

My original goal was to try to recapture the experience of living overseas, that we had in Geneva a few years back (http://vasiliksinswitzerland.blogspot.com/). Kind of like a mini-sabbatical. I thought and researched a lot, but it turns out that kind of experience is really difficult to reproduce on a short-term basis, with a family. Maybe impossible. Yes, you can plop your family down in a new location, but unless you have some kind of connection there (school, work, family) I think you'd feel isolated and disconnected, if you were to stay there any length of time. I'd be happy to hear from people who discovered otherwise.

So, what we ended up doing was pretty much a regular touristy trip, just spending more time than most people would, in the various locations we stayed at. And that worked out fine.

Here's a few general impressions:

- There were next to no tourists in Belgium. At least, in the locations that we went to. I wonder if lots of people stayed away, spooked by the recent terrorist activity?
- The police presence in Brussels was very, very high. Possibly this was because the Brussels airport was where the recent terrorist attack took place.

But in a town less than a half hour away, Ghent, you saw almost no police, even at very large public gatherings (the Ghent Festival).

- The people in England were, in general, really friendly. People walking down the street would sometimes nod and smile at you. And we got into multiple longer chats with people. That didn't happen elsewhere. Apparently this is characteristic of northern England (which is where we stayed).

- England really seems to have a sex-segregated drinking culture. In England, on a Friday or Saturday night, you would see many large groups of people, either men or women, but usually not mixed. They were very carefully dressed, and it really seemed like a big deal. Also I saw lots of groups of women, wearing a colored sash indicating they were in the same group (like a "hen" party, or somebody's 40th birthday celebration).

- I would love to go back to Ghent and York, those were some of my favorite places. Central, friendly, easy, loads and loads of things to do. Both university towns.

What would we do differently? I should have stressed out less over not having everything planned. If you don't go to the main tourist locations at the very most busy times, you don't need to plan so far in advance.

Also, I should have tried harder to find quick-drying clothing. Since I was washing everything by hand, and then trying to hang things in the hotel rooms or apartments we were in, drying time was a major hassle for some things (I'm looking at you, 100% cotton). I did use the tips I wrote about in my article on hand-washing clothing, and that helped.







Thursday, June 30, 2016

I had an ant stuck in my throat

Here's what happened.

We were on a camping trip to beautiful Fort Stevens, Oregon, and my son Peter and I were picking blackberries and thimbleberries along a trail. We had just encountered a nice big patch of ripe thimbleberries, and were eating them avidly - they have a great taste, a little nutty, with a touch of honey. Thimbleberries are native to the Pacific Northwest, and you'll never find them in stores, because they're extremely delicate and usually get a bit smooshed when you pick them.

Obviously there was one ant that thought as highly of thimbleberries as I do. While eating, I got a scratchy feeling in my throat, like something wouldn't go down. I thought I had perhaps eaten a bit of dried leaf stuck to a berry, or swallowed an insect. It wasn't painful, but it was uncomfortable and didn't go away.

We biked back to our campsite, my throat still feeling weird. I gargled, and then tried eating a piece of bread to push whatever it was down my throat. No luck.

I had my husband Eric look at it. He said "There's a black thing in there". I had the kids, with their sharp eyesight, look at it. They told me that there was an ant stuck in my throat! I looked in the car mirror, and it was pretty visible, clamped onto my uvula, which is the dangly thing hanging from the back of your throat.


Can you see it back there? By the way, on the right that's a silver filling, not a rotten tooth.

Now you can see it, right?

I tried getting a spoon and scraping it off. Major gagging was involved, but I wasn't able to scrape it off. I tried wrapping a napkin around a spoon, and scraping it off, to give it a little more friction. Still no luck.

Then I just reached back into my throat with thumb and forefinger, and pulled it off. There was a little tug as as I pulled it off - it was clamped on pretty well!

It sure was a relief to get the ant out of my throat. I had no problem ignoring my gag reflex - having an ant in my throat was a powerful motivator!

And it's out!



Saturday, April 09, 2016

How to create a shortcut on your Android phone to a Google drive doc

The shortcut to my Google doc is in the bottom right corner, above the email icon
I wanted to create a link on my phone recently, to a Google drive doc that I wanted to have quick and easy access to. It wasn't as easy as I thought it would be, so I thought I would repay the world a favor (considering how often I go to the internet for help) and write up how to do it. It's actually very easy once you get past a couple gotchas. This is on Android version 5.1, I'm not sure what other versions it works on.

Step 1 - Go to a blank space on your phone home screen, and long press on the screen.

Step 2 - You'll get a screen that has, on the bottom, the choice of Wallpapers, Widgets, and Settings. Choose Widgets.

Step 3 - Now you get a list of all the widgets that are available. Scroll down until you see Drive (Google Drive).

Step 4 - On my phone, all I saw was 2 options, Drive 4 x 1, and Drive scan 1 x 1. This puzzled me for quite a while. Finally, I realized that you can scroll off to the right, and I found Drive shortcut 1 x 1. Touch and hold on this.

Step 5 - It may look like nothing is happening here, but after a few seconds, it should bring up your Google Drive. Find the document you're looking for, highlight it, and click Select.

Step 6 - You should now have a shortcut on your phone home screen for this doc. Enjoy!


Thursday, March 24, 2016

My craft foam sun visor for ultralight backpacking

In the desert, with my sun umbrella and sun visor
I get big kick out of making my own backpacking equipment, and this was a fun little experiment which turned out well.

Before I went on a desert backpacking trip to Joshua Tree with my friends Jean and Kelly, I made this sun visor, which weighs in at 8 grams. It's made of craft foam, which you can buy at Michael's or Walmart for about 15 cents a sheet (which is enough for one visor). Here's a template that you can use to cut it out.

Once I had it cut out, I poked a hole in the ends, and strung some elastic through, so it would fit on my head properly. It worked really well, and was much sturdier than I thought it would be. Another part of my defense against the sun (very important in the desert!) was a very lightweight umbrella, which I just held in my hand as I hiked.

One thing to consider when using this is that it doesn't protect the top of your head, in case you sometimes get a sunburn on your part. That wasn't a problem for me because I was also using the umbrella, and this visor was just a backup.


Me with my ultralight visor

Thursday, March 10, 2016

Just started podcasts - loving them!

I'm late in arriving at this party, I know, but I've just in the past months started listening to podcasts. And...I love them! Mainly what I love is that it's a different - much, much slower - way of getting information, that doesn't require me to stare into my laptop. Which I do far too much of.

I started listening to podcasts because I was intrigued by some of the subjects on The Voluntary Life - but it turns out it's only available in podcast format, there is no transcript or blog. I played around with a few podcast apps, and ended up using Podcast Republic, which seems adequate.

The main reason I'm enjoying podcasts so much is that it's a way of dealing with my information/screen addiction (I surf the web far too much) that allows me to be doing something else at the same time - cooking, cleaning, playing K'nex with the kids, etc.

Also, interestingly enough, I treat the information I get from listening to podcasts differently from what I get reading an article or blog post. It takes so much longer to listen to a podcast that I actually absorb much more information, and take it more seriously.

One more bonus with podcasts is that the kids are exposed to new ideas as well. They hear what I'm interested in if we're all hanging out in the kitchen and I'm listening to a podcast. Good extra!


Saturday, February 13, 2016

I love cooking in the microwave!

In the past few years I've been gravitating much more to cooking in the microwave. There's many recipes that involve lots of stirring and monitoring when cooked on the stove top, that cook away happily in the microwave with no more than an occasional stir.

Microwave chocolate cornstarch pudding

Here's a few of my favorites :

Microwave Pudding: We used to make instant pudding but this is so much better. I started out making the stovetop version, but the microwave version is so much easier, and you don't have to stand there the whole time, stirring.

Microwave scrambled eggs: This is my latest greatest favorite microwave recipe. I had tried microwave scrambled eggs many times, but always in a cereal sized bowl, which is a big mistake. Now, after some research online, I make them in a mug. Two eggs, scrambled, with a crumbled slice of cheese, in a coffee mug. Maybe some ham bits as well. Cook for 30 seconds, stir and break up chunks, then another 30 second, stir, and perhaps another 10 seconds. Heavenly! Such an easy hearty meal.

Microwave Peanut Brittle: People absolutely LOVE this this peanut brittle. It looks long and involved, but doesn't really take that long. Here's my version.

Microwave Cornbread: Cornbread usually does taste better in the oven, because of the browning. But it only takes 5 minutes in the microwave! And I put it up on AllRecipes.com, as well, and got 81 reviews!

Microwave popcorn: No need for bagged popcorn, this container works great, and I've used it for years - Nordic Ware Microwave Popcorn Popper

Microwave cheese crisps: I absolutely love these! Many years ago I went to someone's house for dinner, and as an appetizer the hostess made cheese crisps, but on the stovetop. They were delicious, like slightly browned crispy cheese. Well, in the microwave, they turn out great, and are so easy! Parchment paper is the key.

Microwave potato chips: just slice them very thin (we use the mandolin), brush some oil on them, and cook in the microwave until crispy and brown.

Microwave mug cake: truly a great idea, this was the rage on the internet about 5 years ago. There's some wonderful and luscious chocolate mug cake recipes out there...if you ask me, though, the key is no egg, and a spoonful of peanut butter or nutella. This recipe is the one I started with.


Sunday, November 01, 2015

Homemade KIND bars - improving the process - Part II

I had a lot of fun developing my version of the KIND bar - those expensive but tasty nut/grain bars that are sold at most Starbucks. My initial recipe is here: Homemade KIND bars - my own recipe, far cheaper and healthier - Part I.

Since then, I've made lots of improvements. That's the pleasure of developing my own recipes, and keeping good notes - I get to continually tweak the recipe to make it easier and better. This recipe in particular needed lots of tweaking because of the inconvenience of dealing with a sugar syrup.

The main improvements are these:

  • I always use a wooden spoon to stir up the ingredients, and every time I stirred (you need to take it out from the microwave and stir every minute or so), I would spend a long time scraping the mixture off the wooden spoon with a knife. It took a long time. Now, I just LEAVE THE SPOON in the bowl while it heats up in the microwave! No scraping off required except at the very end, and lots of effort saved.
  • I'm making much larger batches now. I enjoy these, they keep forever in the freezer, so why not make more?
  • I halved the amount of raisins and/or cranberries I was putting in, and may skip them altogether. They seem to make the bars too sweet.
  • I added coconut. At my favorite grocery store (WINCO) they have unsweetened coconut flakes, which are a little difficult to find, so I stock up when I'm there. Coconut gives a really rich flavor to the bars.

So here's my updated recipe.

INGREDIENTS:
Syrup ingredients
½ cup sugar
¼ cup corn syrup
1 teaspoon salt

Nut/grain ingredients (mix and match whatever dry ingredients you like, as long as it totals 6 cups)
1 ½ cup parched wheat
1 ½ cup peanuts
½ cup cranberries
1 cup almonds
1 ½ cup unsweetened coconut flakes

DIRECTIONS:
Spray non-stick spray on tin foil on cookie sheet, also spray the bottom of a drinking glass for pressing down the mixture
Nuke the sugar, corn syrup, and salt first for 30 seconds, to make it easy to stir
Leave wooden spoon in bowl - no scraping off!
Add the dry ingredients. Mix thoroughly.
Microwave for a total of 3.5  minutes, stirring every minute or so
Empty the bowl onto the cookie sheet, spreading with the wooden spoon and pressing down with the drinking glass
Let cool 15 minutes, and then cut into bars. Don't leave it longer than 15 minutes, because it will harden too much, and crumble when you cut it.
Wrap the bars (I put them in snack size ziplock bags)













Thursday, October 29, 2015

My new side-gig: converting books in the public domain to Kindle format, and publishing them on Amazon

I have a new side-gig now, which is taking old books that are now in the public domain, converting them to Kindle format, and then publishing them on Amazon.

My most recent book
What the heck is public domain, anyway? In a nutshell, books that are "in the public domain", are books that were published before 1923, and whose copyright has expired. This includes all the old classics such as Pride and Prejudice, and Tom Sawyer. However, there's hundreds of thousands of other books also in the public domain, that never got anywhere near as popular, and are not regarded as classics.  But they're are still interesting to read nowadayspartly for historical interest, and partly because good storytelling is timeless.

How did I come up with this idea? I was going through some forums on side businesses, and came across a post from someone who said she was making a small, but completely passive income just from some old books she'd converted to the Kindle format and uploaded to Amazon. The idea intrigued me because I've been a reader of old public domain books for a long time, usually from Gutenberg.org.

My first experience with old books in the public domain was in college. When I was writing my senior honors thesis, I had a study carrel that was right next to a selection of Horatio Alger books. Alger was the original "Rags to Riches" writer, whose specialty was hard-working boys and young men who, through hard work, optimism, and perseverance managed rise up  from poverty tousually not riches, but middle class respectability. They're pretty formulaic, and the themes tend to repeat themselves. Still, I found them interesting enough to read—anything to procrastinate on my thesis. And ever since then, I've had a special interest in old books.

Back to the original forum post that got me interested in the possibility. She had gotten started via a job at her college, scanning a bunch of old books. Instead of just leaving it at that, she also formatted them for the Kindle, and put them up on Amazon. Most of them got no sales at all, but one of them regularly made about $100/month.

The idea intrigued me, partly because I love old books, and partly because there's a gambling aspect to it. Most of the time you make nothing, but every once in a while, you hit a chunk of gold—in her case, a popular book!

So far, I haven't hit any gold nuggets, but I have made a tiny bit of money—embarrassingly small, but it's very satisfying to make any money at all using new skills. And speaking of skills, the really fun part is that I've needed to develop expertise in many new areas. The main ones are image processing (mainly Gimp), Canva for creating book covers (very user friendly, somewhat limited in capabilities), and OCR software for "reading" the page images and converting them to text. Also copy-writing, for creating an attractive description for the book. That's the most gratifying part, and what I like the best—becoming competent in new areas for an immediate need.

Over the long term, I'm pretty sure that this isn't actually a viable business or side-gig. There's just too much of an initial time investment to get a book online in a salable condition, for a public domain book that you can't price very high, and which may not sell at all. Plus, Amazon takes a much larger chunk of the revenue for public domain books—75% instead of 35%. But as a fun hobby "business" that may lead to new ideas, this is very worthwhile.

Here are a few of the books I've put online:

The Finding of Jasper Holt - an old romance novel, so far my best-seller
Julius, the Street Boy - by Horatio Alger, the story of a street urchin from the New York City of the late 1800's who had an opportunity to improve himself by moving out west.
Max and Moritz - Here's what I wrote up for the description of this one:
The story of Max and Moritz is a never-to-be forgotten classic of German culture. This time-honored story has entertained children and adults for over 150 years, and has not lost any of its irreverent humor. The story is not for the squeamish —the two boys do come to a bad end, and are not mourned by anyone in the village—but the pranks, the delightful verse, and the illustrations together make a jewel of a tale. 
This particular edition is actually not in the public domain anymore, because I redid the original old translation (and improved it a lot, I like to think). So even though the illustrations are old, the text is mine.

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Interval training - magic in 30 minutes!

I'm eager to do more backpacking after my 5 day trip in the Olympics recently. I definitely feel the need to be in better shape, though. The friends I hiked with had been training a lot, and it really showed, although I made up for it a little bit by being really anal about pack weight, so I was carrying a lot less than them.

The problem is, I'm not really that excited about exercising. More bluntly - I hate to really work out hard, unlike some of my friends, who love it, and get the famous "runner's high". Not me. I like walking, and I exercise (almost) every day, but it's generally just a brisk walk on the treadmill, about half an hour, while I watch some of my favorite shows on HGTV (currently House Hunter International). And very occasionally, I motivate myself enough do a few push-ups and sit-ups. Yep, I need to kick it up a notch!

So I decided to try interval training. In a nutshell, interval training is working out very hard, but just for a short time, and then going back to a regular pace. Rinse, then repeat. Here's how I did this, training on the treadmill:

  • 5 minutes walking at a regular pace
  • 5 minutes at a regular pace, but a 11 degree incline - very steep! And tiring.
  • Repeat, for about 30 minutes total

The magic to interval training is how very speedily it increases your aerobic capacity!  I could really tell the difference yesterday, on a local hilly walk in the neighborhood. Previously, I got a bit winded on it. And now it's not a problem at all, I was powering up the hilly section. And this is all with only 4 sessions of interval training over the course of a week.

The key to making this work is that the strenuous part of the workout is very tolerable, because you only have 5 minutes to do!



Sunday, August 23, 2015

Pros and cons of renting an RV from Cruise America

We just got back two days ago from a long RV trip - almost 3 weeks - in which we rented a 25 foot class C RV from Cruise America. I'm not going to go into the details of the trip, but I do want to jot down a few notes on how the actual RV rental worked out. Also, since the trip was also meant to help us decide if we should buy an RV, I'd like to jot down a few notes on that as well.

In Canyon Creek campground, close to Bend
Overall, I was happy with the trip. We had great experiences, the weather was outstanding almost all the time (baring a forest fire here and there!), and we saw some really beautiful sights. Now, for a more pro/con way of looking at things.

Pros
  • It's good to have everything with you, there's not the dislocation of moving from one hotel to another, and hauling luggage around. Over a longer trip, this makes a big difference.
  • You can cook food in the RV. We did eat some meals in restaurants, but mostly we ate very simple meals (think spaghetti noodles with spaghetti sauce, with a can of fruit) in the RV.
  • You stay in campgrounds, which are generally very friendly places. We had great talks with people just walking around the campground, and striking up conversations. If you're staying in a hotel, that just doesn't happen.
  • You can also stay in campgrounds with a tent, but putting up and taking down a tent as for as many different places as we stayed at - that would have ended up being a huge hassle, and a trip like that wouldn't have worked.
  • You don't need to plan as much as you would if you were staying in hotels. Mostly we just showed up at campgrounds, and were able to stay there. A couple times (usually Friday and Saturday nights, which, as summer weekends, were much more booked than other nights), we just pulled off the side of the road, or at a trailhead, and spent the night there. This kind of flexibility wouldn't have been possible if we'd stayed in hotels.

Cons
  • Driving this big, very rattly RV was exhausting. Eric did all the driving, and even though we kept the hours of driving very low (some days we didn't drive at all, some we drove 1 or 2 hours, only the first and last day did we drive more than 3), it was a strain, much more so than driving a car would have been.
  • You don't have a small car with you, to do little trips. No matter where you want to go, you're taking the big rig with you.
  • Renting an RV like this is expensive! It would have been quite a bit cheaper to take our car, and stay in hotels.
  • The actual RV that we rented was a disappointment. Everything worked, more or less (except the cold water faucet handle on the shower came off, we had to use a pair of pliers!), but the RV was VERY old, rattly, like I mentioned above, and not very clean. Every time I sat down on the upholstery, I shuddered a bit because it was really just grungy. A rental car is much, much cleaner in comparison.










Saturday, August 01, 2015

Cato University!

I attended Cato University this past week. It was a tremendously illuminating time, I met all kinds of interesting people that I would never run into in my normal everyday life, and I was absolutely blown away by the quality of the speakers. I've been exposed to a lot of the economic and philosophical theory behind libertarianism before, but this week was truly special, and I also learned just how much I didn't know.

These are my people!

Notes from our trip to Costa Rica

Just a quick blog post with a few notes on our trip to Costa Rica, to visit our good friends Steve and Ilana, with their kids Benji and Marina. They've been teaching at an international school there for a year now, and are happy and tanned, but we really miss them!

Most of the pictures are here, but I put a few noteworthy ones below as well.

Here's a couple things that struck me:

  • My Spanish reappeared! I used to be fairly fluent (almost 25 years ago!), and it substantially came back. It helped that, before going, I had watched a lot of the TV show Arrested Development on Netflix, in Spanish. I was planning on doing more - trying to find a tutor for conversation practice, etc - but I'm glad I didn't, since my Spanish was good enough.
  • The currency is Colones, and there's about 500 to the dollar, so it's easy to figure out the approximate price in dollars
  • In San Jose, there were security people all over the place, the "guards" to whom you pay money to watch your car, also lots of security personal at the stores (for instance, the tiny little Claro cell phone store had their own security guard who opened the door for us)
  • Our kids had an awesome time playing with Benji and Marina. Peter usually played with Marina, and Kenny with Benji. Peter said, "It's kind of like we're two teams, me and Marina, and Kenny and Benji".
  • We really liked the "Soda" home style restaurant. Usually food was very well cooked, and really reasonable. I usually had rice, beans, platanos (baked sweet plantains), some salad, and some type of meat (chicken or beef). 
  • Road closure can suck. The lodge we stayed at in the La Fortuna area was behind a road which was closed by a landslide, so we had to do a long detour many times during our stay. 


After boogie-boarding, building a fort with the boards

One of many dinners at Soda Osiris - we loved that place!

A mud bath

Road closure - No Hay Paso!

Squeeze pouch beans for lunch

Zipline tour

Saturday, July 25, 2015

Arguments for and against the minimum wage

I follow a lot of libertarian blogs, which are of course against increases in the minimum wage (and usually against a minimum wage entirely). And then I also occasionally read articles in the New York Times on the minimum wage, and the comments on those articles. The New York Times and it's readership usually skews very liberal, so they're in favor of increases in the minimum wage. There's lots of  talk about inequality, how increasing the minimum wage will help the poor, etc.

The comments highlight various studies, some of them finding that increases in the minimum wage do NOT increase unemployment, and some finding that they do. Everybody, both the pro and the cons side, has an ax to grind, and provides only the research and data that supports their side.

I was trying to think of effective, non-confrontational ways of convincing people that the pro-minimum wage argument is fatally flawed, and that passing a law making it illegal for people to accept a job paying less than $15 an hour is not a good thing. (Notice how I framed the argument artfully to support my point of view there, i.e. "making it illegal for people to accept a job paying less than $15 an hour" vs. something like "forcing fat cat employers to pay poor people a living wage".)

It's challenging, and frankly I don't see how somebody with any background in economics can not understand that making something more expensive makes it less likely that people will purchase it. Labor is a product very similar to other products.

But here's a thought experiment for the minimum wage supporter, who doesn't believe that increasing the minimum wage increases unemployment. Think back to those times when you were actually an employer. For me, this comes mostly from when we still needed babysitters for the kids. If I could have hired a trustworthy babysitter for about $5/hour, I would definitely hired babysitters far, far more often. But babysitters, especially reliable ones that I liked, usually charged far more than that. So, I didn't have them that often. I didn't purchase the labor that they were selling, because it was too expensive. Instead, I just did without the babysitters unless I really needed them.

The same thing applies when a minimum wage is set, or raised. Employers have options too. They'll invest in more technology instead of employees, or just not expand. One way or another, they'll do without the labor, if it's too expensive for them. Or they'll just go out of business.



Thursday, July 23, 2015

Service trips to third world countries - useless or not?

I was in the Dallas/Fort Worth airport yesterday, and saw two large groups of teenagers wearing t-shirts that identified them as traveling with a church group on a service trip. One of the service trips was headed towards Costa Rica, and the other, Haiti.

My immediate reaction to group such as these is - how could they possibly do anything useful? They almost certainly don't speak the language, or have any skills that could come in handy. So how are they serving?  That's really the only part that bugs me - that they call it a service trip. Call it a homestay, language learning, something like that - that's fine. I think it's very good for pampered teens to see other parts of the world that aren't so wealthy.

But calling it "service" is false, because they're not doing useful work. I've heard of orphanages being painted, and repainted, and repainted again, all because groups such as these need service projects to work on, and the orphanage receives a substantial donation in exchange for hosting these "service" trips. Also, mostly on these types of service trips, the teens stay together in groups - easier for their chaperons to manage, but they interact much less with the locals.

Here's a couple links on these kinds of trips:
http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2010/nov/14/orphans-cambodia-aids-holidays-madonna
http://pippabiddle.com/2014/02/18/the-problem-with-little-white-girls-and-boys/

In the interest of full disclosure - I was on a trip somewhat similar to this many years ago, in Nicaragua. It was in the 1980's, I was in college, and this was a "solidarity" type group, against the US-supported Contra rebels. I wouldn't have considered myself a socialist at that time, but I was far more liberal than I am now, and didn't have nearly as much skepticism (cynicism?) about government in general. The trip was 6 weeks, and it was the first time I'd been in a third world country. It was incredibly interesting, I had a lot of memorable experiences, and met people that I never would have been exposed to without this program.

For part of the trip, we were meant to be helping out at a Habitat for Humanity project. That was the service component of the trip. They were organizing and funding a project to build low cost cinder block homes in the area we were headed to, and all of us in the group (about 6) "helped". The helping part was truly ridiculous. There was a group of locals who knew what they were doing, mixing cement. They had an interesting trick to make the shoveling easier. One guy would actually be holding the shovel, and another would yank at a string tied to the shovel, right where the wood handle meets the metal, to make it easier to lift. They had to be very much in the right rhythm to make it work. Perhaps they just didn't have enough shovels.

Anyway, us volunteers had never mixed cement, and also had very little experience with shovels. We were entertaining to watch, I'm sure, but pretty close to useless.





Sunday, July 19, 2015

When "green" doesn't mean "frugal"

A friend who works at Google was commenting on all the extensive remodeling that they've been doing in the past few years - tearing buildings down and rebuilding, or doing extensive reconstruction, always ostensibly to make it "greener".  He was grousing about how very not-green it was to be constantly sending massive amounts of building materials to the dump.

That struck me as a good example of what I'd been thinking for a while - that a lot of what's marketed as being "green", is actually a holier-than-thou version of conspicuous consumption. For instance - some people would only buy the most eco-friendly plastic food container, heavily marketed as being made from all post-consumer waste. But they would never consider reusing, say, a plastic sour cream container for their leftovers. Or more likely, they wouldn't even save leftovers.

Another example - some parents wouldn't blink an eye over their children throwing out much of a meal, instead of saving it for later. But they would insist on buying all organic foods because they believe it's better for the earth.

What does being green actually mean? I just looked it up online. The big online dictionaries don't appear to recognize what appears to be the most commonly used meaning nowadays, that of being eco-conscious. The definitions just refer to the actual color aspect of being green. Maybe because it's too difficult to define. I think most people would say that going green means using fewer resources, and recycling more. But using fewer resources - are you using fewer resources to save money, or are you using fewer resources to...what? What if the resources are like the blackberries that grow wild in a field behind our house? If we used fewer of those resources...is that a good thing?

Okay...I'm not going to win any awards here for persuasive writing. But what I'm trying, inelegantly, to say, is that when being "green" is not at all related to frugality, then it can be a faddish thing. Like people buying a Prius when you could get a much cheaper car that isn't necessarily electric, but uses fewer resources (less of your own money, in any case!). It's just another form of conspicuous consumption.